Fluffy and Crispy Buckwheat Waffles

Updated: Feb 7


Ricky and I have been on a buckwheat kick lately because buckwheat flour makes The.Best.Pancakes.and.Waffles. Plus, who doesn't love soba noodles? The nutty flavor and satisfying texture comes from buckwheat!


Whole grains and pseudo grains, like buckwheat, amaranth, quinoa, farro, millet, oats, and more, individually offer their own set of nutrients including vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients and fiber. Studies show that getting a variety of whole grains may help diversify gut bacteria, creating balanced gut microbiota, which may be health promoting.


Buckwheat is packed with fiber including prebiotic fiber for gut health. It also has a considerable amount of protein with 15 grams of plant-powered protein in one cup of buckwheat flour (that's quite a bit!). What's more, it's considered a complete protein since it has adequate amounts of all essential aminos acids. Buckwheat is filled with phytonutrients, B vitamins, and minerals like iron, copper and magnesium. It’s also the only grain that has an antioxidant called rutin, which has been shown to help with circulation and cholesterol.


Fun fact: buckwheat is actually from the rhubarb family and not a grain at all! It's classified as a grain because of its nutrient composition. For those following a gluten-free diet, It's also naturally gluten-free, despite having "wheat" in its name.


To learn more about whole grains and pseudo grains, and their benefit to health, visit Carbohydrate: Friend or Foe and How Carbohydrate-Rich Food Impacts Gut Health.


These buckwheat waffles are a yummy way to give this pseudo grain a try. For more fiber and prebiotic-goodness, we topped them with blueberries and banana cashew cream (recipe below). Since these waffles have a nice blend of carbohydrate, protein, and fiber, they make a satisfying and energizing breakfast that will last you all morning long. But, they could also be a fun dessert!

Other ways to enjoy these waffles...


Athletes, listen up: Are you looking for an ideal post training recovery meal? Make buckwheat waffles or pancakes with a nut or seed butter your BFF! Add a nut or seed butter spread on top of the buckwheat waffles plus some fresh fruit for a great balance of carbohydrate and protein including leucine, a key amino acid, for muscle synthesis. Or, consume the waffles or pancakes an hour or two before training for consistent energy throughout your training session.


Do you love a healthy and energizing snack? Umm, yes, please. Buckwheat waffles not only make a yummy and satisfying breakfast, but also a great snack since they have a nice blend of carbohydrate, protein, and fiber for sustained energy and satisfaction.



Transform the batter into waffles or pancakes and enjoy them immediately or store them in the refrigerator for up to 7 days for an awesome snack or breakfast on-the-run. You can also freeze them in an airtight container for up to three months and pop them in the toaster oven straight from the freezer.


Prep time: 10 minutes

Cook time: 10 minutes

Makes: Approximately 8-10 4" waffles


Ingredients

  • 2 cups plant-based milk, unsweetened

  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar

  • 2 cups buckwheat flour

  • 1 tbsp baking powder

  • 1 tsp cinnamon

  • 1/4 tsp salt

  • 1/4 cup applesauce

  • 3 tbsps maple syrup

  • 2 tsps vanilla extract


Directions

  1. Make your plant-based buttermilk: Add plant-based milk and apple cider vinegar to a medium bowl. Set aside. 

  2. Add buckwheat flour, baking powder, cinnamon, and salt to a large bowl. Stir to combine.

  3. Add the applesauce, maple, vanilla, and buttermilk to the dry mixture. Stir again to combine all ingredients.

  4. Spray waffle maker (or griddle if making pancakes) with oil to prevent sticking.

  5. Turn on and preheat your waffle maker according to which done level that you want. I recommend medium for light and fluffy. Your waffle maker may only have an option of the light going off when it's ready. That'll work too! Just make sure it's preheated before you add the batter.

  6. Using a ½ cup measuring cup or a ladle, scoop out some batter and pour/spread into the middle of the greased waffle maker. Depending on the size of your waffle maker, you may need to do this twice. Don't overfill as it'll overflow! Close the waffle maker and let cook until the steam has completely stopped from the waffle maker or when it tells you it's done.

  7. Remove each waffle and place on a baking sheet in your oven on "warm" or 200 degrees F to keep warm and crispy until finished with the entire batter. Continue with the rest of the batter.

  8. Top with whatever you love on waffles. Try the banana cashew cream or spread nut or seed butter on top. Add some colorful fruit and sprinkle with cinnamon. Comment below with some other fun ideas!

Nutrition per waffle:

146 calories, 6 grams protein, 2.5 grams fat, 25 grams net carbohydrate, 5 grams fiber, 208 mg sodium


Good source of vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, B12, calcium, copper, magnesium, phosphorus, and zinc.

Banana Cashew Cream


Preparation time: 5 minutes

Cook time: none

Serves: 8 (3-4 tablespoons per person)


Ingredients

  • 1 cup mashed banana

  • 1 cup cashews, soaked in hot water for 30 minutes or room temperature water for 4 hours then drained

  • 1/2 cup plant-based milk

  • 3 tbsps maple syrup

  • 2 tsp vanilla extract

  • pinch of salt


Add all ingredients to a high-speed blender, food processor, or immersion blender and blend until smooth. If using a food processor or immersion blender, it may take several rounds of blending and scraping the sides with a spatula until you get the smooth consistency. It's worth the wait!


Nutrition per 3-4 tablespoons: 119 calories, 4 grams protein, 7.5 grams fat, 10 grams net carbohydrate, 2 grams fiber, 25 mg sodium


Good source of vitamin B6, copper, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, and zinc.